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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
years answering the same question. but right after the election, we sent a plan to the president where we gave revenues but looking for spending cuts. and he took three weeks to come back to us. he has gone on still on the campaign trail, still working through. but you have to understand, republicans have not waited to solve this problem and sat back. in the summer, we passed a bill that froze the rates, and passed it. it sat in the senate. we believe we want to solve this problem. we think this is our moment. this is our time. >> is the moment -- does it come down to this, where you would say, look, we'll give you higher marginal tax rates if we get something significant on spending, medicare, in return? >> it doesn't solve the problem. if the president is asking for higher ratings, he is asking for more revenue. most economists agree the best way to get that is through closing special loopholes. and when you close those, it makes a fair tax process. so people invest on the return, not invest based upon what the irs says. >> senator durbin, the opening position, as i sort of gleaned i
the election and said to the president, you want revenue here. you want revenue on the wealthy, we'll give it to you, limiting tax deductions for the wealthy. the president instead of taking that and running with tceiling a deal has been campaigning for tax hikes and to cap it off sent treasury secretary tim geithner to congress with this outrageous proposal as basically a compilation of everything that the president wanted in his budget and beyond what he even campaigned for. as a result i think most republicans wonder how serious he is about doing this. they feel things are going backward. >> paul: yeah, that, that's the way it sounds to me, too, i talked to some senior republicans this week and they're increasingly of the belief that maybe the president wants to back them into a corner, that could push them over the cliff and then be able to blame them if you have a recession or for taxes going up on everybody. >> well, i don't doubt that's what he's trying to do. it's hard to see where the upside is for the president if the economy slips into recession, talking about 2013 having no gro
the wealthiest americans should pay more taxes than they do right now. the people you elected to get things done simply are not getting it done, not even close. but maybe we should not be surprised, because in a cnn/orc poll taken a few weeks ago, 67% said washington officials would behave like spoiled children in fiscal cliff discussions. only 28% said they would behave like responsible adults. with that in mind, here's what the key players, the grownups, have said in just the past 24 hours. listen. >> the math, it doesn't work. >> his proposal was so outlandish, i don't think we should go back to the table until he puts something there that we can work with. >> we're not going to twist ourselves into contortions to appease a vocal minority. >> what i'm not going to do is to agree to a plan in which we have some revenue that is vague. >> republicans have proven to be willing to be held accountable. democrats have not. >> we look forward to working with the president when he decides to get serious. >> we're looking for solutions and it doesn't seem at least from the president's proposal that he
unemployment numbers add to the president's leverage? >> i think they do. the big thing is the election. but the jobs numbers suggest that the economy is doing well and it cuts against the republican argument that raising taxes on the rich with would hurt the economy and the economy is fragile. the numbers though that the economy is not fragile and that would improve the economy's leverage. he's still doing so many public events. he is trying to use that public pressure to sort of force the republicans to cut a deal. >> doing this public stuff but at the same time having these private talks with the speaker and david axelrod talked about what the president and speaker might be doing behind closed doors and the reasoning behind it. let's listen. >> both the president and the speaker are very fluent in the basic numbers. they have been living with them for some time now. so as i said, i don't think that there's a lot of mystery about this. the politics has to be traverse. they've got to get through the rocky shoals of grover norquist. >> does that make it easier to keep politics out of it
campaigned for re-election on the idea of a, quote, balanced approach, end quote, to deficit reduction, a mixture of tax increases and spending cuts. here's the plan that the republicans say you presented to them. >> i can tell you what i presented. it will be helpful. >> chris: let me -- >> it is our plan, let me do it. let me explain it. >> chris: i'd like to ask you about this part of it and you can tell me. >> okay. >> chris: $1.6 trillion in tax increases. more than $80 billion in new stimulus spending, next year, and, unspecified nonguaranteed spending cuts. question, is that your idea of balance. >> it is, let me explain what is in the explain they didn't report to you and explain, to people, which is, we propose alongside the trillion dollars in spending cuts we agreed with republicans, last year, on defense and a range of other government programs, proposed $600 billion of detailed reforms and savings, to our health care and other government programs, that is $600 billion. in fact, the health care savings in that plan, are larger than the plans we have seen republicans in the
what you will of the declining influence, they did influence the outcome of this election and i think that they're certainly trying to leverage off of that since the election. >> well, they-- that was one of many, many, many factors. >> absolutely. >> and after the election and the fact is, as we all agree, the private sector union is a dying animal and that they only can survive if they can thoroughly control the public sector and this is just another example of their slow, painful death. >> on that upbeat note. i want you to look at this. the parent company of red lobster, filing a fight for the president's health care law, not because of the actual law, because it criticized the law. the gang from forbes is going to explain the top of the hour, up next, did any of you see this? >> oh! oh! >> apparently these guys just found out that they could get fined for eating while driving. is nothing sacred? having you ship my gifts couldn't be easier. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about tha
tax rates and he was elected based on his tax the rich policy. he says that america is poised to take off and if it doesn't, it's the republicans fault. listen. >> you have the u.s. chamber of commerce hardly an arm of my administration or the democratic party. i think, said the other day, we can't be going through another debt crisis, a debt ceiling crisis like we did in 2011. that has to be dealt with. so, i think businesses are going to be ready to hire. we're seeing pretty strong consumer confidence despite weaknesses in europe and even in asia. i think america is poised to take off. stuart: well, the republicans are set to respond today when speaker boehner goes in front of the cameras. will he show signs of retreat or any sign of compromise? remember, the president wants higher tax rates. will john boehner try to move the line that the president has drawn? we will have it for you live here on "varney & company" starting around ten o'clock eastern. then we have darden restaurants, the parent of olive garden, red lobster. it says its businesses could be hurt by bad publicity. dard
have to give him credit, calm, cool, collected, holding the line and remembering what this election is all about. get your cell phones out. i want to know what you think. tonight's question. will republicans punish speaker boehner for trying to work with the president? text a for yes, b to no to 622639. you can always go to our blog and leave a comment. we'll bring the results later on in the show. joining me tonight is congressman emanuel cleaver from missouri. congressman, great to have you with us. >> good to be with you. >> you bet. i would like to talk about the congressional black caucus if i could. they have been very, very strong about do not touch the entitlements, we're not going to move on this. so you have the president not moving on rates. you have your caucus not moving at all on entitlements. although you said the democratic leadership -- you said you could support means testing for medicare. what does that mean and how far are you willing to go. >> first of all, social security is off the table. there are not only 42 members in the congressional black caucus who woul
working inside the elected -- the elected claim ber of the united states stat or better off resigning and becoming head of the -- head of heritage? it was a no-brainer. you know -- >> remarkable. >> financial incentiveta. but it's remarkable and shows you limits in which being a united states senator -- i've talked to other senators who made the decision to try to get into leadership track who said it's no fun trying to be party of one or gang of six or gang of eight. it stinks especially ex-governors can't stand it in there. it is sad that you don't feel as if you can make a -- as big of a difference inside the senate as you can at a special interest group. welcome to politics of the 21st century. >> i couldn't agree more, chuck. frankly i think jim demint couldn't agree more. he said, i'm leaving the senate now but i'm not leaving the fight. i've decided to join the heritage foundation at a time when the conservative movement needs strong leadership in the battle of ideas. chuck, to your point. kelly, i want to go to you. in the midst, and we'll talk about the fiscal cliff in a minu
of the election. issues like entitlement reform and new revenue, but he's going to have to do something big. there's been a four-year course of he doesn't get along with either party, doesn't make the kind of effort you're talking about. i don't think there's any doubt he's going to, particularly john boehner, find some human interconnection moment that says we're doing this. and that's when the tough part starts. because once there's a leader deal, getting it through the house, whatever the terms of it is going to be super hard. >> i was with a group of businessmen last night, and their question was, why don't the people in washington do what we do when there's an important decision that comes up? why don't they get into a room and hammer it out, get some food, drinks, whether it's a couple days, get them helicopters, and go to camp david. you get in a room together -- >> the president -- the president doesn't like doing that. he's not comfortable doing that. and jon meacham, that is not the opinion of a pundit, that is a matter of historical record for his first four years. is it not? >> that's
for democrats for raising taxes in the next congressional election. >> absolutely. breaking the republican party would be a benefit to this plan, also, i don't think barack obama minds in the tax rates go up on the middle income people as well. >> paul: he's promised-- you're saying-- >> the ultimate win is to have all of that new revenue for the government and being able to blame it on the republicans. >> paul: wait a minute, if you're saying we go over the cliff, nothing happens in december, come january the president will not turn around and insist on andis ... >> well, things in the middle east went from bad to worse this week with reports to the syrian military is preparing temp cal weapons that could be used against its own people, it's awaiting final orders from president assad. this as protesters clash with supporters of mohammed morsi outside the presidential palace in cairo egypt. in that country's largest confrontation since the uprising of hosni mubarak. we're back with daniel henninger and editorial board member matt comiskey. so, bret. we were told if we did intervene in syria we
is getting elected. nobody cares deeply about the future of america. we have america to urge with the israelis to negotiate with the palestinians. urging to negotiate with everyone but us in washington. we don't negotiate. our parties are so extreme. i'm a relatively wealthy person. i want to be paying more taxes. i want our taxes to go to serve the policies of the country, education, charity, health care. i think that president obama's right about this. but i think compromise is going to be necessary to achieve some result. >> let me bring in abbe. your father is known as a moderate republican and a good dealmaker, a man who used to negotiate. what do you make of this? and what does he make of this? >> i think morale is so low right now. the country's so divided. especially for my generation. we're the ones that are going to be handed down the $60 trillion defic deficit. they will come to a deal. but right now, it's political theater. and it's probably going to look like the simpson-bowles. that will come full-circle again. >> here's a problem the republicans have got themse
and that's one reason he's going. he wasn't happy with the 2012 elections. do you think conservatism just didn't make the case in the elections last november? >> we always have to do a better job at how we speak about liberty, the constitution and how inclusive it is and how it offers things to people who have not yet experienced the fruits of liberty. so i think we can always do a better job. what i will say about jim demint is he has started and brought some liberty-minded libertarian/conservatives to the senate. we have a pretty good caucus now. there's a real strong jim demint influence in our caucus. >> great stuff. senator rand paul, kentucky, thank you sir. all the best. >> thank you. >>> so besides praising jim demint, senator rand paul said something very interesting. he said he will not vote for a filibuster. he said, let larry reid, no filibust filibuster, 51 vote, simple majority and then he will vote no and let the democrats have the onus of the big tax hike. quite interesting. now here's a political threat. is the republicans at risk of becoming the party of the rich while p
said, you can't be serious? i just never seen anything like it. we have seven weeks between election day and the end of the year, and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. >> okay. you heard for the first time in two decades now acknowledge revenues can go up as part of the balanced plan, a good first step, but they have to deal with rates and revenues. >> this talk has lawmakers and analysts skeptical. they could strike a deal to have hundreds of billions in tax increases set for january. still, both sides have been through the debate before. they know the options available to cobble a deal together. one aid says it's too early for either side to reach an agreement knowing they still have to show to their members they pushedded for every possible point to secure the best deal possible. still, it is getting late, and the sides are trillions apart. back to you. >> all right, rich, rich edson in washington. >> we have two more weeks before anything is done. >> might be. >> let's talk with the next guest saying republicans should give into the tax cuts for the rich,
talking about every morning here since the election. fiscal cliff, big, big issue. there are now, it seems, growing numbers of people on both the right and the left who would like to see us just go over that fiscal cliff. how big of a problem would that be? >> that would be a big problem. i actually still believe that those -- the democrats, the administration, republicans in the final analysis don't want to see that happen. they do understand that not only would that present a problem in the near term as we went over the cliff at the end of the year, but we still then have the whole debt ceiling fight that would transpire shortly into the new year. the issue isn't simply the negative result of going over the cliff, but it's also that business, consumers, everybody continues to hold back on the uncertainty. and we believe the economy is pretty well positioned potentially in 2013 if we can put this behind us. so i think a lot of what's going on is what you would expect to see in this negotiation, very public negotiation, which is not the best way to do it. i think at some point, the preside
a pretty dramatic shift since the election, and certainly i salute him for doing this, he actually is very engaged with the business community. and i'm not hearing the sort of things from top ceos and business leaders today that i heard the first four years. maybe -- maybe he's leaning in here and trying to rebuild a relationship with some of these people who supported him in '08. >> and i think it goes both ways. i think the business community views this deficit thing as the biggest problem that we can solve that we need to solve. there's something called a campaign to fix the debt, which i'm on the steering committee, 120 leading ceos from everything from general electric to jpmorgan on down. really committed to doing something and accepting the idea that revenues have to go up, not ideological about how, but most of all, wanting a big $4 trillion package. and so they have become, in effect, allies of the president. they're really trying to get to the same place. at some point there may be differences over how much entitlements, how much this or that, but right now their interests are al
. susan rice's appalling words when she put election politics ahead of stopping the again side in rwanda. before that tweet was deleted. a 2002 article claims rice said this. if we use the word again side and are seen as doing nothing, what will be the effect on the november congressional election? our foreign affairs reporter is out front tonight. elise, does the criticism against rice add up, do you think? >> i don't think 100%, soledad. susan rice was director for u.n. affairs at the national security council at the time of the again side, the rwanda again side. that office dealt more with the united nations than with africa, even though the united nations was dealing with the issue. at the time it was a working level staff position. her first in government, ambassador rice could make announcements at that level, but wouldn't be involved making an important decision getting involved militarily in rwanda. president clinton said he made the decision, it was the greatest mistake of his presidency, and ambassador rice travelled to rwanda after the again side. she said seeing the ground li
, people were saying you got to incorporate poll workers for the election. you had holiday hiring. you had sandy. i mean, it may be -- the journal argued it's the least important jobs number in five years. >> i saw that. i do think one thing we can certainly say given that china seems to be stabilizing a bit, we can all discuss europe. greek situation. maybe it's off the front pages for a while. and so if we assume that the jobs picture in the u.s. is not bad, let's assume not bad, it puts even more of a focus on the fiscal cliff negotiations because it becomes even more binding one would assume in terms of good or bad for the market, for the economy. >> kernen had a good point. does strength mean the economy could handle a cliff or is it so good you wouldn't want to tamper -- >> if i wanted to create a recession, what would i do? i would raise everybody's rates. i would cut the unemployment benefit. just trying to think of a theory of how i could cause a recession. i would cut back government spending quickly. >> i would raise interest rates to 20%. >> bernanke ought to join the -- look,
the cliff. that's why the day after the election i tried to speed this process up by making the concession to put revenues on the table. it's unfortunate that the white house has spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> the administration has presented a plan that calls for $1.6 trillion in new tax revenues. $400 billion in cuts to medicare and other entitlements. $50 billion for a new stimulus and congress would have to give up control over raising the debt limit. republicans have indicated that they want to raise revenue by lowering tax deductions, haven't given any specifics yet. brings us right to white house correspondent brianna keilar. good morning, brianna. >> good morning to you, soledad. yes, things are at an impasse here. i will tell you the white house after not being very happy with the pace of negotiations the week before last sent treasury secretary tim geithner up to the hill to outline this proposal. there's a lot we already knew about that president obama had already taken a public position on. the white house is now saying to republicans as well, we want you to put
? he was just re-elected. why couldn't he put together a package, a deal to avoid this disaster? >> i think this is a question of political leadership. and as that poll showed, there's no doubt that the president has the political advantage going into this. but at some point, and i think we're kind of getting close to it, the president has to be able to pivot and to say how do i turn this political advantage into a real policy accomplishment? and, wolf, i don't think you're going to do that with continued campaign style events like we just saw meeting with middle class families. okay. we get that. that occurred during the campaign. the white house has clearly gotten its message out. i think now there has to be a next step. you know, timing is everything in politics. and this is absolutely no different. what i'm getting from talking to some democrats on the hill is i think there's actually a lot of pent up anger and frustration among democrats how they feel republicans were obstructionist for the last four years. there's a little bit of payback going on here. they've got the advantage.
. >> we've the got seven weeks between election day and the end of the year, and three of those weeks have been wasted. >> steve centanni kicks off our college tonight from washington d.c. steve, where exactly do we stand tonight? >> well, harris, democrats are hoping republicans to raise taxes on the wealthy and the republicans are accusing the white house of wasting time. and saying that he didn't have a serious proposal when he reintroduced a plan to reduce 4 trillion dollars. >> the president asking for 1.6 trillion dollars worth of new revenue over ten years, twice as much as he's been asking for in public. his system spending in here that exceeded the amount of new cuts that he was willing to consider. it was not a serious offer. >> but so far it's the only white house offer on the table, a starting point for further negotiations, one would assume, harris? >> not to sound pessimistic, but it's a fact, even if he reached a deal tonight, it would tough to meet that deadline by the end of the year, because there's red tape profit to deal with. >> that's right, it takes time and time to
? there was an election. >> that was not a serious offer that was made. >> well, it was an offer and the republicans haven't made a serious or nonserious offer, joe. >> you've got to go through the house. where is the house plan? >> well, i don't know. but that's -- >> stay tuned. >> our guest hosts will be with us for the rest of the program. up next, we'll talk about monday morning markets. goldman sachs jim o'neill is our special guest. find out if europe or the fiscal cliff is keeping him up at night. >>> later, food for thought. our how dominos is handling economic conditions and their plans to hire for the holiday season. >>> do you think this group of people will find some common sense solution? >> yeah, i think they will. i'm not sure thooes they'll do it by december 1st. >> we know a lot about the opportunities are if they don't. >> in private, in my view, he'll get to something. >> we encourage congress to put aside the political rhetoric and rise above it to make sure we have revenue >>> welcome back, everybody. let's get a sense of where the market is heading in 2013. joining us right now is j
. they can't govern either. >> i was so hopeful, i wasn't obviously thrilled with the election results, but i actually thought that result might be the result we needed to get thefshs done. >> in a way you you have the situation where -- >> you extend 98 but not the 2? believing that story is so -- >> either raise them on everyone or raise them on -- either it will hurt the economy if you raise taxes or it's not. on 98 it won't hurt, on 2 it will -- >> we'll have more on this argument. in the meantime, let's talk about some of the other headlines. financial firms are gathering for the goldman sachs financial services contractors. a key presenter is brian money tha moynihan. we talked about his reports of planned fee increases. plus there was the issue of president obama's likely pick to follow tim geithner at treasury. we talked about how buffett threw out jamie dimon's name. here is what moynihan thinks about that idea. >> i won't give individual names, but i think what warren is expressing a view which i agree with is that we need to have very bright, very talented and very broad experience
, the former companisy campaign manager of president obama's re-election campaign. howard kurtz the host of "cnn's reliable sources" lauren ashburn, republican from texas, congressman jeb hensarling with us, randy weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. all guests this morning. wednesday, december 5th, and "starting point" begins right now. >>> our "starting point" this morning, president obama putting his foot down. he says no tax hikes for the wealthy, no deal. america hits that fiscal cliff in 27 days and that means tax hikes and deep spending cuts if the democrats and the republicans can't come together in some kind of a deal and with just ten days remaining until congress is scheduled to go home for the holidays, the clock ticking. here's what he told bloomberg news. listen. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up and we're not going to be able it to get a deal without it. >> we start this morning with white house correspondent dan lothian, he's in washington, d.c. okay. so who's got the ball in their court at this point then, dan? >> well,
that the president is pushing for? >> that's right and i also feel that president obama was re-elected for a reason. an most of the people in this country go along with his idea that the wealthy need to pay their fair share. i think that it would be totally irresponsible on his part and the republicans if they don't come to a decision on this before the first of the year, and get something ironed out -- >> so, richard, what do you think? should we go off the cliff? should we just see where the chips fall? >> no, i do not agree with going off the cliff. we should come to something, some type of an agreement here. but the wealthy should pay their fair share. i do believe in that. >> mayor hall, your town relies on federal funds to keep your water drinkable at the local treatment plant. so how would going off the cliff affect your city budget? >> well, you know, any time that you're dealing with funds that the tax payers money is involve in, you've got to look at the checks and balances and if they cut spending, there is a possibility that that will be cut and our resources will go down the drain lite
and will not help those seeking work. i came out the day after the election to put revenues on the table. to take a step towards the president to try to resolve this. >> is there someone you could agree to tax rate increases and protect small businesses may be at the same time? >> there are a lot of things that are possible. the president insists on this position. insist on my way or the highway. next. connell: speaker of the house john boehner. dagen: i think ed henry says no progress and charges at the white house. connell: there is the optimism. it has been waning anyway on the stock market. the speaker talk to you about the phone call about the president needing to get more serious. we will talk more about that coming up. mark warner is supposed to join us from capitol hill later this hour. right now, back to the morning jobs report. 146,000 jobs added in november. the unemployment rate fell to 7.7%. both were better than expected. the thing we will focus on is the big story behind all of this. maybe the fact that a generation of americans are being impacted by the lack of a full-time job. pa
't know, maybe because he thinks he can. he won a big election and push it on whether it's right or wrong. stuart: i think he had a round of golf with former president bill clinton just the other day. >> yeah. stuart: and bill clinton was-- you voted for him, twice. >> i sure did, he was a good president. stuart: do you think there's they chance that some of the moderation of blirn will rub off on the leftism of president obama? >> no, i think that clinton's leverage is gone totally. he supported obama totally in the election. without clinton i don't think that obama would have been reelect and that's what he did for him. and what clinton could do in the future, i don't know. i don't know why obama is so insistent on higher tax rates except it fits his rhetoric. stuart: at the end of the day, i think that the republicans will actually submit on the issue of higher tax rates. it may be just tax rates higher for those making half a million a year, i think they'll retreat a little bit. >> i think, too, what i'd like to see the republicans do, i'd like to see them pass a bill extending tax cu
-sex marriage should be legal. 46% say illegal. and on election day, voters in three states approved same-sex marriage. "outfront," mckay coppins, tim carney and maria cardona, cnn contributor and democratic strategist. this is kind of big news in all of this. tim, you saw the polls. now the supreme court will get involved in this. should this signal something to the republican party? should they say it's reached this level? >> polls are one thing. there's also the fact most states don't have gay marriage yet and most of those that do, it was not put in by the will of the people. i'm a marylander. our state did vote for gay marriage. most of them had to do with judges ruling. if the supreme court does for gay marriage what it did for abortion and roe v. wade and said, no, this is not in the hands of the people. we're going to say there's gay marriage, that would do a thrott fire up the republican base and could turn this issue on its head and become a big winner for republicans because they'd feel disenfranchised. >> what about the flip side? what if the republican goes that way, their ba
square and near the presidential palace. they're very upset that their newly elected democratic president morsi is doing things that they not so democratic. he is trying to make it so his decisions are not subject to judicial review. at least six civilians have been killed and hundreds injured in the violence. president obama called his egyptian counterpart yesterday to express concern about the situation that seems to be spinning out of control. he urged president morsi to meet with and negotiate with the opposition. >>> and then there is syria, where nbc news reports the assad regime is preparing chemical weapons that can be loaded on the missiles. and human rights groups say more than 40,000 people have been killed in the last 21 months. we here in america are really intent right now on how we will rewrite our tax code. but if matters in egypt and syria or israel and the palestinian territories which are already getting pretty deadly and tragic and chaotic, if they get worse, the crisis about high end marginal tax cuts will begin to look a lot less like a crisis in comparison. ♪ if i
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)